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SECONDHAND SERENADE:  AWAKE  THE TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOUR

www.LeoPresents.com

SECONDHAND SERENADE: AWAKE THE TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOUR

Hawthorne Heights, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus

Thu, March 2, 2017

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 5:45 pm (event ends at 10:00 pm)

$20.00

This event is 15 and over

Secondhand Serenade
Secondhand Serenade
As a former #1 Myspace artist, John Vesely, better known as Secondhand Serenade, went on to sell over 2 million units of his hit single "Fall For You" which hit the top of the charts. After touring the world, delivering 4 releases and playing on numerous television shows, John is back in the studio once again prepping his next release.

On September 11, 2012, John released the album "A Naked Twist In My Story" which peaked at #58 on the iTunes Top 200 Albums list as well as #19 on the top Alternative Albums list on iTunes. The body of work (his first since parting with Glassnote Records) is a re-record of the album "A Twist In My Story" with each song recorded in a fresh light. All the tracks were done with acoustic / orchestral production, catering to the fans who fell in love with his first album, "Awake".

Secondhand's next album was funded entirely by his fans via Pledge Music. It will be a full band album and is expected to be completed later this year.
Hawthorne Heights
Hawthorne Heights
Remember when today's middle-aged working stiffs were once young Generation X-types who were wearing ironic T-shirts reading "FREAK" or "LOSER," words that mirrored their grunge-centric ennui? Then there was one band who made that pervading nihilism even more stylish by rocking black shirts with the word "zero" in silver glitter. But while the z-word has the capacity to taint test scores, bank balances and attempts at self-actualization in ways no other common integer can, it does represent more positive ideals. Consider the terminology used by project managers to herald the beginning of a big project: Year Zero. What's the numerical equivalent used when someone uses the metaphor of "hitting the reset button" on their lives and/or careers? That's right: zero.

For the members of Hawthorne Heights, the word (or number) isn't the providence of losers, nor a bastion of stylish disconnection. Zero, the fifth album from the Dayton, Ohio, outfit, represents a positively incandescent future. Now aligning themselves with Red River Entertainment, Hawthorne Heights—singer/guitarist JT Woodruff, guitarists Micah Carli and Mark McMillion, bassist Matt Ridenour and drummer Eron Bucciarelli—are rising above their post-hardcore roots in ambitious measures. Overseen by producer Brian Virtue, Zero marks a wider breadth of the band's capacity to create compelling work, regardless of the social implications found in certain music subcultures. (Translation: Team HH tossed the punk-rock rulebook into a wood chipper.)

"When people hear Zero, they're going to be hearing a new band," Eron Bucciarelli beams. "What we're trying to accomplish is to reinvent ourselves and not be so attached to our history. I think there are elements of Zero that pay homage to Hawthorne Heights' past, that we should by no means attempt to ignore. To a certain degree, we are the same people that wrote The Silence In Black And White. We're just older now."

While many of the participants in America's post-hardcore sweepstakes have toiled in the underground with a mere modicum of success (if any), Hawthorne Heights achieved much in their 12-year existence. Since their inception in 2001, the band made heads swivel with their brand of melodic post-hardcore heightened by the interplay between frontman Woodruff's "clean vocal" and the late rhythm guitarist Casey Calvert's screaming. Their 2004 debut, The Silence In Black And White was not only a benchmark for the band (the release was certified gold-status), but also for the attendant "screamo" aesthetic both critics and fans credit the group with bringing into the forefront. 2006's If Only You Were Lonely repeated gold-selling success for the band, further establishing them as a dynamic live act.

"I think for a lot of people, Hawthorne Heights were that bridge band that got people into more commercial acts like Green Day and Blink-182 to transition into more underground music," Bucciarelli opines. "For one reason or another, we were people's first introduction to screaming in music. So for better or worse, that's one of the main things people think about our band. Maybe our contribution to the larger canon of underground rock is to be a segue into that underground world."

After the untimely passing of Calvert in 2007, Hawthorne Heights carried on as a quartet, issuing two more full-length albums, Fragile Future (2008) and Skeletons (2010). But after extricating themselves from their last label deal, the band returned to the roll-up-your-sleeves, DIY aesthetic that got them on the post-hardcore radar all those years ago, recording, distributing and marketing two EPs Hate and Hope. "When we made those EPs," Bucciarelli begins, "we had a chip on our shoulder. But all the while that we were angry, we still had a lot of confidence in ourselves and our ability to make music our fans wanted to hear. We were definitely a lot more optimistic for the future."

In addition to marking a significant growth in the band's artistry, Zero also represents the culmination of how Hawthorne Heights conduct themselves as a unit. Knowing full well that today's bands are businesses through and through, each member was assigned a certain aspect of the band's affairs, from recording and mixing, booking tours, merchandising and promotion. After playing with the band live for three years, longtime friend of the band Mark McMillion would become an official member. ("It made sense to have him with us," figures Bucciarelli. "He's a great guitarist, he can sing, and it's nice to have another set of ears in the studio.") The band decided that the follow-up release to their two EPs would be conceptual, with a story arc. "We wanted to make a grand album, something we've never done in our entire career," says the drummer. "We focused on what songs would work toward supporting the story line, as opposed to front-loading the album with all the 'best' songs first. At first, there was some hesitation in the studio. 'This is kinda weird.' 'Is this possible?' We all came together and assured ourselves that we just had to commit to it in order to make it happen."

The backdrop of Zero takes place in a post-apocalyptic, dystopian future where a totalitarian government (the Coalition Of Alternate Living Methods, aka CALM) systematically drugs the populace in order to keep them docile. The central protagonist awakes one morning to find his whole life completely decimated, as if he was dropped into the middle of a desolate vista of scorched earth and wasteland. The hero has to battle the government—as well as the constant barrage of memories that haunt him—in order to find answers. While the song-cycle format is an interesting departure for Hawthorne Heights, the songs are still vibrant, even when dissected from the greater concept. Tracks like "Memories Of Misery," "Darkside," "Golden Parachutes" and "Anywhere But Here," contain equal measures of pop sensibility, as well as lyrical heft. But there are also touching and unnerving moments at play: The acoustic melancholy of "Hollow Hearts Unite" is a mix of altruist sentiment and helplessness colliding. The title track sports Woodruff's wounded vocal and a guitar solo that wouldn't sound out of place on a David Gilmour album. "Lost In The Calm" is a deathbed spectator trying to cope, set to a rapid beat that mirrors the song's urgency. When you consider the current controversy surrounding the activities of corporations intersecting with government (stick "Monsanto" or "fracking" in your search engine of choice and see what happens) futures, Zero doesn't sound like contrived fiction. In his role as both recording artist and doting father, Bucciarelli genuinely worries about these constructs.

"Some of the themes [found on Zero] factor into my daily thought processes of things, moments like, 'Should I give my daughter this kind of food to eat,' and on top of that thinking, 'What can we do to stop this from happening?' it's kind of scary to most people, and that's why a lot of these ideas have been branded as conspiracy theory—nobody wants to acknowledge it in a hear-no-evil, see-no-evil kind of thing. If some listeners associate some of the themes from this record to real-life situations and it opens their minds up, I think that's definitely a good thing."

It's also a good thing that Hawthorne Heights are still out there. As one of the founding names in the foundation of post-hardcore/contemporary punk, the quintet are reinvigorated and ready to go where their new vision will take them, from the stage of this year's Warped Tour to the rest of the world. It might sound like a self-deprecating quip, but the truth has a much greater resonance: The sum total of Hawthorne Heights' parts equals Zero. And it's far more valuable than mindless slacker nostalgia.
The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus
The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus
Our Objective: Writing straight forward rock songs about topics that are REAL and you can relate to. There's no hidden meaning. We want you to understand and we want to share it with you. RJA is a family and we want you to be a part of it.
About Us: Well, to make it short and sweet, We're five poor country boys from florida that gave up everything to share our music with people. But if you'd like to read into it more...feel free...

What's in a name? Well, it depends who came up with it. In the case of Middleburg, Florida quintet The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, it might mean anything. Jumpsuits can be sleek and fashionable, tight and revealing. Or they can be loose and homogeneous, suggesting redundancy and confinement befitting a jailbird. Red is often flashy and easily noticeable, but it's also the color of blood. And an apparatus allows a jumpsuit to be used for a specific purpose, such as leaping from an airplane - or it could be something sexual. After all, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus are ballsy and emotional, pulsing with vibrancy and tenacity. They're strong, yet vulnerable, and they shift between musical styles with the confidence of superstars.

Strange then that The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus means absolutely nothing. "It's 100 percent completely arbitrary," laughs singer Ronnie Winter. "When we started the band, we only cared about having a good time and writing good songs far more than coming up with some symbolic, incredibly intelligent name."

"I think its funny when bands scramble their brains to try and come up with some unique, untouchable band name," adds guitarist Elias Reidy. "Why waste time thinking of something when we could be concentrating on music instead? The locals loved it, so we went with it."

A brief listen to The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus debut and its obvious that these boys have spent a lot of time concentrating on their music. Their songs are flush with the determination, hunger and energy of youth (the average age in the band is 21). And while they tap into elements of pop-punk, pop, screamo, and metal, they combine them in a way that's both surprising and invigorating. "In a time when everything's labeled and categorized, you kind of have to try your best to step outside the box and be as unpredictable as possible to separate yourself," explains Reidy.

"Yeah, but we like to mix unpredictability with the comfort and melody people want to feel when they hear a song," clarifies Winter. "You can't just be crazy, ridiculous. You have to stick to the point musically and make the song catchy to the listener."

No worries there. On just their first record, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus already have mastered the difficult art of ensnaring the listener, whatever particular style theyre delving into. Face Down blends propulsive, chugging guitars, a steady beat and yearning pop vocals and climaxes in a detonation of dissonance and a volley of screams. In Fate's Hands (the name of Reidy and bassist Joey Westwoods' former metal band) starts with plangent acoustic strumming then abruptly shifts into overdrive with start-stop guitars, tumbling drums and a chorus as angry as it is infectious. And Cat and Mouse is a melancholy ballad anchored by a repeating delicate piano line that surfaced as if by magic.

"We were at a showcase for a record label, and we were pretty sure we weren't ready, so everyone was on edge," recalls Winter. "So, to calm his nerves, [guitarist] Duke [Kitchens] sat down with his guitar and just started playing. I walked up to him and said, Dude what is that? And he said, I just came up with it. So I said, Keep playing it. Dont stop. And I made him play for two hours straight while we wrote the entire song all the way through."

In addition to being musically adventurous, Winter doesn't shy away from confessional, confrontational lyrics. The cantankerous Seventeen Ain't So Sweet addresses a female friend who has an amazing voice but has been unable to make a dent in the music industry because she doesnt look like a plastic pop idol, and the reflective, flowing Your Guardian Angel shows Winters letting down his guard and trying to express what it really feels like to be in love. But its Face Down, a scathing indictment of domestic abuse, which hits hardest.

"Where I come from, you see it when you go to the store, you see it when you stop for a smoke, you see it all the time," Winter says. It's something everybody sees and doesn't do anything about because they're just so accustomed to it. I was the same way and I was a victim of it. So the best way I could think of to get people to not make the same mistake I did was to write about it."

Winter and Kitchens, the only original members left in the band, formed The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus in 2003 just for kicks. For 18 months they wrote and rehearsed with no real intention of playing shows or recording an album. When some friends who heard them jam suggested they play out, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus started booking gigs and were immediately embraced by the local scene. "We played this place called The Art Bar twice, and the second time we played it, we sold it out," Winter says.

Encouraged by the response, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus contacted the owner of a local studio to see if they were ready to start recording. When the response was a resounding yes, they recorded their first EP, using it to promote themselves wherever they could - online and at local concerts, high schools, colleges, malls, beaches and other locations across Florida. Although the reaction was undeniable, the industry wheels didn't start turning right away. The band showcased for several labels to no avail, leading to discouragement between members, some of which left or were removed from the band.

Determined not to give up, the remaining members posted ads around town looking for new members with the same level of dedication and motivation. After auditioning several dozen guitarists, Winter accidentally returned Reidys' phone call about the opening one night at 2 AM and the conversation eventually led him to meet up with the guys an hour later. The group clicked immediately - Reidys' playing style complimented Winters while providing a fresh perspective on the bands sound, and by the morning, the band had taught Reidy five songs.

Their fan base continued to build to an almost unheard-of level for a local band, in-turn attracting New York-based management. Winter then added drummer Jon Wilkes (whom he met years ago when his old band jammed with Wilkes' group), and the current lineup was then completed when Elias brought in his childhood friend and former band mate Joey Westwood. "The whole situation was solely based on fate," recalls Reidy. "Originally, Ronnie randomly approached Joey in a record store and told him they needed another guitarist. After joining the band I re-introduced them to Joey who became the new bass player. It only made sense." Just a few months later, following a flurry of industry attention, the band signed with Virgin Records.

With their line up in place, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus entered the studio last year with producer David Bendeth, who has previously worked with Hawthorne Heights and Breaking Benjamin. "We were blown away with the sonic-quality of the Breaking Benjamin album, so we were really excited to work with him," Reidy says. "Plus, he really understood our vision."

"He really challenged us to make us a better band," Winter adds. "It wasn't always easy, and when we did something he wasn't happy with, he'd say, 'That's not good enough. You can do better and you're going to do better.' And you know what? We did."

From the chugging riffs and serpentine guitars of Atrophy to the steely rage of Justify to the tender lament of Cat and Mouse, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus are determined to get their music across to the masses. There may have been a time when they didn't know if they were ready to be heard, but those days are gone, and now they're eager to tour the world and beyond with the conviction that, when your music speaks so eloquently, who cares what's in a name.
Venue Information:
The Cabooze
917 Cedar Ave
Minneapolis, MN, 55404
http://www.cabooze.com