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NEEDTOBREATHE

NEEDTOBREATHE presents TOUR DE COMPADRES featuring

NEEDTOBREATHE

Switchfoot, Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, Colony House

Fri, July 24, 2015

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$35 - $38

Sold Out

This event is all ages

$1.00 per ticket sold will be donated to the Palmetto Medical Initiative – PMI

NEEDTOBREATHE
NEEDTOBREATHE
NEEDTOBREATHE is a GRAMMY-nominated, American Rock 'n' Roll Band
from South Carolina, effortlessly woven from the musical traditions and faith of
their upbringing in the Deep South of the United States. Made up of brothers
Bear Rinehart (vocals, guitar) and Bo Rinehart (guitar, vocals), Seth Bolt (bass,
vocals) and Josh Lovelace (keys, vocals), the band hit their big break in 2005
when they signed to Atlantic/Lava/Word Records. The career to follow would
include four full studio albums, chart-topping cross-genre success, multiple
headlining tours and media coverage on CONAN, The Ellen Degeneres Show,

The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Late Show with David Letterman, CBS, MTV, FOX and much more. The band's critically
acclaimed fifth studio album, Rivers In the Wasteland was released on April 15,
2014, and debuted at #3 on the Billboard Top 200 Chart.
Switchfoot
Switchfoot
SWITCHFOOT

Jon Foreman (vocals/guitar) / Tim Foreman (bass) / Chad Butler (drums) / Jerome Fontamillas (keyboard/guitar) / Drew Shirley (guitar)

As they enter their 17th year as a band, Switchfoot has achieved a level of success that brothers Jon and Tim Foreman and their high-school friend Chad Butler never anticipated when forming the band in San Diego in 1996. The SoCal natives have sold 5.5 million copies worldwide of their eight studio albums (including their 2003 double-platinum breakthrough The Beautiful Letdown and 2009's Grammy Award-winning Hello Hurricane), racked up a string of Alternative radio hit singles ("Meant to Live," "Dare You To Move," "Mess of Me," "The Sound (John M. Perkins' Blues)," "Dark Horses," and "Afterlife"), performed sold-out world tours (visiting five continents in the past year alone), raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to aid homeless kids in their community through their own Bro-Am Foundation, and earned themselves a global fan base devoted to Switchfoot's emotionally intelligent and uplifting brand of alternative rock.

So when it came time to write the songs that would make up their ninth studio album, the members of Switchfoot were looking for a challenge. "The point became, 'What are we going to do to push ourselves,'" Jon recalls. "Could we take ourselves somewhere we'd never been before, yet achieve a feeling of comfort at the same time? How do we go to a new place that feels like home?"

Switchfoot found the answers on the road and in the waves. A year ago, while touring in support of their 2011 album Vice Verses, the long-time surfers set out in search of inspiration by visiting several of their favorite surf breaks around the world. "The idea was to surf, write songs, play music, and see what ideas came," says Tim. The band traveled to Jeffreys Bay and Crayfish Factory in South Africa, Bronte Beach in Australia, Raglan in New Zealand, and Uluwatu in Bali, and chronicled their physical and emotional journey, as well as their unshakeable brotherly bond, in Fading West — a documentary film that features stunning locales, revealing interviews, jubilant live footage, and glimpses of Switchfoot at home and in their studio in San Diego. Like Rattle and Hum meets Endless Summer, the movie is part travelogue, part surf film, and part behind-the-scenes look at the making of the band's upcoming new album, which will also be entitled Fading West.

Not surprisingly, the album, which finds Switchfoot returning to the melodic pop sensibility of their early years, was inspired by the sea, which Jon describes as a perfect metaphor for simultaneously experiencing comfort and danger. "You're comfortable out there, but it's the unknown," he says. "You can paddle out in South Africa and it's exactly like home and nothing like home all at once. That's what I'm hoping our record feels like — trying to find peace in dangerous places."

There's a memorable scene in Fading West where the band members are paddling out at Uluwatu with their friend, surf champ Rob Machado. Jon says he had a major epiphany that day. "As I sat on my board in the Indian Ocean, I realized that these waves could eventually make it back to my home of San Diego thousands of miles away," he says. "That rhythm and pulse was really grounding and inspiring on so many levels. It made me grasp the dichotomy between the pull of the road and the pull toward getting back home. It's like we had to leave home to find home. For a long time, home was a place of failure because it meant that we didn't have any shows," Jon adds. "When you drop out of college in your early '20s and all your friends are getting jobs and you're the guy who lives with his parents, it's way better to be on the road. Only recently did I feel like home was a place where I could feel comfortable and content."

Switchfoot traces its roots to the beaches of San Diego when the Foremans and Butler connected as surfers (Jerome Fontamillas joined in September 2000 and Drew Shirley in 2005). Though they competed in national surf championships on weekends, their real bond came from a common love of music. They decided to form a band, chose the name Switchfoot (a surfing term), put themselves through months of sweaty rehearsals in their garage, and then hit the road. After just 20 gigs, Switchfoot signed with re:Think Records and released three albums, The Legend of Chin (1997), New Way To Be Human (1999), and the gold-certified Learning to Breathe (2000), before signing with Columbia Records, which released their fourth album, The Beautiful Letdown, on its Red/Ink subsidiary, upping the band to Columbia proper after the album sold more than a million copies. (It eventually sold 2.6 million.) The band released two more albums with Sony, 2005's Nothing Is Sound, which debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard album chart, and 2006's Oh! Gravity., which climbed to No. 1 on the iTunes Album chart, before going their separate ways with the company.

Itching for creative freedom, Switchfoot financed the building of its own studio where they recorded their seventh album, the hard-hitting Hello Hurricane, and its groove-oriented follow-up Vice Verses, both of which they released on their own lowercase people records via Atlantic Records. (Jon also released four solo EPs and a debut album with Fiction Family, his side project with Nickel Creek's Sean Watkins.)

Along the way, Switchfoot have been steadfast in their commitment to giving back by supporting various humanitarian causes, such as DATA, the ONE Campaign, Habitat for Humanity, Invisible Children, and To Write Love on Her Arms. In 2005, the band held its first annual Bro-Am, a day-long event that includes a surf contest, live concert on the beach, charity auction, and after-party at local tavern Belly Up. Now in its ninth year, the Bro-Am has raised more than $715,000 to benefit local children's charities that aid at-risk, homeless, and street kids in San Diego. "We've got a really young fan base and some of the kids who come to our shows are homeless," Tim says. "You'd never know it, but they are. I think we've always been drawn to the underdog, and I can't think of a bigger underdog than a kid who's fighting for his life at the age of 12."

Switchfoot premiered Fading West on opening night of the 2013 Summer X-Games in August. (The band have been very active in the action sports world, having performed at numerous NFL and MLB post-game events, as well as at the US Open of Surfing in 2011.) They will spend the fall on a unique tour, with the film serving as the opening act to a more intimate, stripped down performance from the band. The film will be released digitally towards the end of 2013, with the new album seeing it's release on January 14, 2014.

We weren't chasing anything in particular when we started the band," Jon says in the film. "We simply had these songs that we loved playing. It's that joy that fueled us and it's that joy that has kept us going and brought us to here."

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Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
Drew Holcomb and his band, The Neighbors, are made of surprises. Holcomb himself is a beautiful tangle of seeming contradictions; a bourbon drinking divinity scholar with a penchant for duck hunting and first edition books. The Neighbors (Ellie Holcomb, Nathan Dugger, and Rich Brinsfield) are a close knit group of friends and family who, together with Drew, have hit a new stride.

Ten years and 1500 shows into their career, they have sold out headlining tours and played alongside the likes of The Avett Brothers, Ryan Adams, Los Lobos, and Susan Tedeschi.

Their sixth studio album, Good Light shows the band at a new peak and taking their brand of Americana back to the basics. Says Drew, "On past albums I was searching for my voice, both literally and figuratively. I co-wrote a lot of songs, peppered the music with too many influences, and let too many other voices in my head."

Good Light brings us the essentials; it's pragmatic approach shows us what might be the band's best material to date.
Colony House
Colony House
In a relatively brief span of time, Colony House has emerged as a vibrant creative force,
as well as a beloved fan favorite with a passionate, fiercely loyal fan base. That audience is likely to expand substantially with the release of When I Was Younger, the Nashville, TN trio's first full-length album, whose 14 compelling original tunes fulfill the
abundant promise of the band's three widely-acclaimed, self-released EPs.

It's not surprising that Colony House has struck a resonant chord with listeners. The threesome maintains a balance of craft and immediacy that reflects its affinity for the sound of such alt-rock outfits as Interpol and The Killers, while echoing the influence of
such alternative icons as U2 and New Order. They've assimilated their multiple influences in a manner that's wholly distinctive, adding tight harmonies, strong instrumental chops and a keen melodic sensibility that's all their own.

Lead singer, guitarist and principal songwriter Caleb Chapman writes effortlessly infectious tunes that resonate with personal experience and emotional authority. The songs' messages of faith, hope and perseverance are matched by the organic musical rapport of Caleb and his bandmates, brother Will Chapman on drums and Scott Mills on lead guitar and harmony vocals.

"The songs I write have always come from deep places, whether they're deep places of joy or deep places of hurt, and it can be hard inviting people into those places with you," Caleb states.
That openhearted attitude is reflected throughout When I Was Younger, both in Caleb's expressive vocals and in the band's vivid performances of such personally-charged tunes as "Silhouettes," "Second Guessing Games," "Keep On Keeping On," "Waiting for My Time to Come" and "Won't Give Up," which exemplify the combination of sharp lyrical insight and indelible melodic craft that makes Colony House special.

As When I Was Younger demonstrates, much of Colony House's appeal lies in the three bandmates' powerful rapport, which extends into every aspect of their lives—and which has defined their approach towards the music.

"Our musical and personal chemistry goes hand in hand," Caleb affirms. "The three of us are best friends, which means that at any given moment we are each other's worst enemies as well. Being in a band is like being in a marriage—it's a constant reminder of your own pride, and a reminder that you have to be willing to sacrifice in order for it to be successful. We've made a conscious effort to build the foundation of the band on
our friendship, and then letting that spill over into our creative relationship."

As the sons of Contemporary Christian pop superstar Steven Curtis Chapman, Caleb and Will Chapman have been steeped in music for their entire lives. They began making music together in early childhood, playing with their dad as well as their own
combos. In 2009 they joined forces with Scott Mills, who they'd met through a cousin.

Although initially known collectively as Caleb, the trio rechristened themselves Colony
House in 2013, borrowing the name of an apartment complex in their hometown of Franklin, where Will and Scott as well as Caleb's future wife had all lived prior to the band's formation.
The new combo quickly began to win attention, bringing its charismatic live shows to fans via diligent touring, while earning critical raves with a series of acclaimed EPs: Colony House, Trouble and To the Ends of the World. Along the way, the band
members found time to pursue other musical adventures, with Caleb collaborating with Will's wife, singer Jillian Edwards, as the In-Laws, and Will moonlighting playing drums on tour with noted indie combo Ivan and Alyosha.

But Colony House remains the focus of their musical lives, as When I Was Younger makes clear. "We labored on the album for a long time," Caleb notes. "We began recording it in September 2012 and finished it in July 2013. We had our dear friends
Joe Causey and Ben Shive co-produce it, which made it a very special experience.

They knew that this was our first full-length project, and I think that they felt the responsibility to help us tell our story the right way.

"Creating this record had such a strong set of contrasting emotions: joy, hope, frustration, sorrow, uncertainty, confidence," he continues.

"These songs are questions that I have been wrestling with for months, sometimes years," Caleb asserts. "They're stories I had been trying to write in the dim light of my 100-square-foot room long before they were ever brought to life in a studio. We created
the album conceptually, trying to keep in mind the rules of telling a story. There must be a dramatic arc, a beginning, a middle and an end. So in that way, every song is a piece of the equation. The front half of the album is a bit more lighthearted and fun, and then the back half gets a bit heavier. And the last third, starting with 'Won't Give Up,' is very important to us."

Perhaps the most startling aspect of When I Was Younger is the band's forthrightness in addressing some deeply personal, emotionally raw issues, most notably the accidental death of Caleb and Will's 5-year-old adoptive sister Maria Sue in 2008. That tragedy is addressed on several of the album's songs, including "Keep On Keeping On" and "Won't Give Up," underlining the songs' recurring themes of faith and family.
"It has been a difficult thing to do, sharing your family tragedy when telling your story or singing your songs," Caleb states. "But I think that it's important to tell. Everyone has a story of pain, of heartbreak, of a letdown or failure, and that is a thread that ties us all together—the ones on stage and the ones in the crowd. We were dealt a painful hand, but it's what has bound us together so tightly. We want to create honest art, and this is
the most important thing that has happened in our lives, so it would be a hard thing to leave out of our story."

That heart-on-sleeve honesty is just one of the qualities that make Colony House a special band, and make When I Was Younger such a remarkable musical statement.

"We believe that we have a story to tell—a story of hope and perseverance—and that's what we want to leave people with," Caleb concludes. "We are not in the business of writing tragedies. We have experienced tragedy, but we've also seen hope triumph. Our faith is woven throughout everything we do musically, just as it's woven into the foundation of our lives."
Venue Information:
Cabooze Plaza
917 Cedar Ave
Minneapolis, MN, 55404
http://www.cabooze.com